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Developing Professional Skills books are designed as supplemental texts that can be used to incorporate skills training in legal drafting, client interviewing and counseling, negotiation, advocacy and policy-making into traditional doctrinal courses. The skills exercises in each book are based on fundamental rules and doctrines learned by reading the professor's primary textbook, which makes it possible to incorporate the skills exercises without sacrificing the scope of coverage or assigning additional reading. The exercises may be completed either inside or outside of class in one hour or less. Each exercise requires the student to complete a work product template that may be used for assessment purposes.

The Teacher's Manual for each book contains a key to major casebooks, a summary review of the rules and doctrines that underlie each exercise, and suggestions for conducting the exercise and assessing student performance. The Teacher's Manual also provides suggestions for expanding classroom discussion to include ethical issues, professional responsibility concepts and the norms of modern legal practice.

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Developing Professional Skills Series


  The Series Titles

▼ Bankruptcy (2016)
▼ Business Associations (2013)
▼ Civil Procedure (2013)
▼ Constitutional Law (2014)
▼ Contracts (2013)
▼ Criminal Law (2017)
▼ Criminal Procedure (2017)
▼ Environmental Law (2016)
▼ Property (2011)
▼ Workplace Law (2017)



DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: BANKRUPTCY (2016)

Written by: Margaret Howard, Lois R. Lupica

Developing Professional Skills in Bankruptcy is designed to give students the type of assignments they can expect to receive as first or second year associates. These assignments range from thorny questions requiring analysis of the law and memo drafting, to reviewing and proofreading a motion “sloppily” drafted by another lawyer. These skills are not typically taught in law school, but they are indispensable in practice. The book includes 12 exercises, some substantive and some extremely practical. The exercises are also designed to get students to write, and write and write, in a variety of contexts, for a variety of audiences. Some of the exercises expose students to the Official Bankruptcy Forms as a way of getting them to think about the information required to be disclosed in a bankruptcy case and the big picture issues implicated. Each exercise requires students to keep track of and “bill” their time. Particularly in consumer bankruptcy practice (but also in business practice, which may involve intense fee scrutiny) it is important to be mindful of how much a task, project or issue costs to resolve. A comprehensive Teacher's Manual provides guidance and suggestions for expanding the classroom discussion to include ethical issues, professional responsibility concepts, and the norms of modern legal practice.

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Sample Materials:
Sample Brief—Harry & David
Sample Brief—Wet Seal
Table of Contents


DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS (2013)

Written by: Michelle Harner

Incorporating skills training into a traditional Business Associations course is challenging. This creative and original book provides ten independent exercises designed to develop student skills in legal drafting, client interviewing and counseling, negotiation, and advocacy. Each exercise is based on fundamental legal rules and doctrines so that the book can be used on its own or as a supplemental text with any doctrinal casebook. Students are required to spend a manageable one to two hours on such tasks as outlining discussion points for major meetings and negotiations, drafting advisory letters to clients, crafting a demand letter to a board of directors on behalf of shareholders, negotiating indemnification provisions, drafting a certificate of incorporation based on the clients’ stated objectives, and developing strategies to manage delicate corporate client communications. Each exercise contains a work product template that the student must complete for assessment purposes. A comprehensive Teacher’s Manual provides guidance and suggestions for expanding the classroom discussion to include ethical issues, professional responsibility concepts, and the norms of modern legal practice.

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Sample Materials:
Table of Contents
Introduction
Preface
Sample Chapter 1


DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: CIVIL PROCEDURE (2013)

Written by: Paula Schaefer

The Civil Procedure book in our Developing Professional Skills series -- used as a supplement to your regular text book -- makes it easy to integrate skills training into the civil procedure classroom. The book contains ten exercises designed to develop practice skills of legal drafting, client interviewing and counseling, negotiation, and advocacy. Students spend a manageable one to two hours on tasks including: interviewing a client and then drafting a short complaint; preparing an outline of key arguments supporting a motion to dismiss; negotiating the "clawback" of an inadvertently disclosed document; and drafting a statement of undisputed facts to support a summary judgment motion. Realistic pleadings, discovery, and other documents from the case file are included throughout the book. A comprehensive Teacher's Manual provides guidance and suggestions for expanding the classroom discussion to include professional responsibility concepts and the norms of modern legal practice.

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Sample Materials:
Introduction
Preface
Table of Contents
Sample Chapter 1


DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (2014)

Written by: Brannon P. Denning

Skills training and Constitutional Law are not always readily associated with one another. This book shows that it can be done! The goal of this book is to provide ten exercises to develop student skills in legal drafting, client counseling, advocacy, and negotiation in a Constitutional Law context. The problems are based on topics covered a basic Constitutional Law class and can be used with any doctrinal casebook. The assignments range from analytical emails and letters to clients to revising legislation and negotiating settlements over constitutional claims. The problems can be assigned individually or to groups, and each contains an optional legal ethics component. The Teacher’s Manual provides an analysis of each problem, along with suggested discussion points for both the ethics component as well as ways to introduce professionalism concepts alongside basic Constitutional Law doctrine. The Manual also suggests modifications to the problems that would allow their use in consecutive years.

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DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: CONTRACTS (2013)

Written by: Debora L. Threedy

This book seeks to aid the professor who wants to introduce skills training within the context of a traditional doctrinal course. Legal education is on the cusp of a new era. Law students and the profession are demanding that students leave law school better prepared for practice, with lawyering skills in place. Concurrently, learning science has shown that experiential learning (for example, a skills-based simulation) improves student outcomes with regard to mastery of a subject. Incorporating skills training into a traditional Contracts course is challenging, however, as professors feel constrained to cover the basics of doctrinal law and may not feel well-equipped to teach skills. The book provides ten independent exercises designed to introduce students to the skills of legal drafting, client interviewing and counseling, and negotiation and advocacy, but with a particular emphasis on contract drafting, as that skill is so closely tied in to Contracts. Each exercise is based on fundamental Contracts rules and doctrines so that the book can be used as a supplemental text with any doctrinal casebook. Students are required to spend a manageable one to two hours on such tasks as replying to a client e-mail, writing a demand letter to an opposing party, interviewing and counseling a client, litigating a breach of contract claim, negotiating a contract term and an amendment to a contract, and drafting specific parts of a contract, such as a representation or a condition, as well as negotiating and drafting a settlement agreement. A comprehensive Teacher's Manual provides guidance, particularly with regard to how to present and assess the skills involved, and suggestions for expanding the classroom discussion to include ethical issues, professional responsibility concepts, and the norms of modern legal practice.

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DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE (2017)

Written by: Renée McDonald Hutchins

Faculty teaching criminal procedure often find it difficult to craft relevant, well-defined exercises that require students to apply the rules governing the investigation and adjudication of criminal cases. This innovative book offers ten separate assignments that encourage students to develop the wide range of skills they will need for the effective practice of law. Each of the exercises is grounded in well-known and widely-taught rules of criminal procedure. Consequently, the book can be used with virtually any criminal procedure text. Students using the book will have the opportunity to develop skills such as:
  • Writing an email in a professional setting
  • Brainstorming case strategy
  • Drafting a suppression motion
  • Negotiating a plea
  • Drafting an appellate brief
  • Making an oral argument


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Purchase Book
Law Faculty Review Copy


DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (2016)

Written by: Sandra B. Zellmer, Robert L. Glicksman

Using Developing Professional Skills: Environmental Law as a supplement to your regular casebook makes it easy to integrate skills training into the classroom. The book contains nine exercises designed to develop skills in drafting, client interviewing and counseling, negotiation, and advocacy, in addition to providing an opportunity for students to hone legal research and analytical skills. Many of the exercises are intended to help students understand regulations and to effectively represent their clients in the administrative law context. Students spend a manageable two to three hours on tasks including: interviewing a client; e-mail correspondence; drafting comments in response to a notice of proposed rulemaking; drafting and responding to a citizen suit complaint or a petition for review of administrative action; preparing an outline of key arguments supporting a motion to dismiss; drafting a response to a motion for a preliminary injunction; and negotiating with a regulator. Each chapter prompts students to grapple with ethical issues and to apply the Model Rules of Professional Conduct as well. A comprehensive Teacher's Manual provides guidance and suggestions for resolving the legal issues posed by the problems and for expanding the classroom discussion to include professional responsibility concepts and the norms of modern legal practice.

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Law Faculty Review Copy


DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: PROPERTY (2011)

Written by: Colleen E. Medill

Developing Professional Skills: Property introduces you to the variety of skills that differentiate the law student from the experienced legal practitioner. Like any type of skill, acquiring professional legal skills takes time and patience. Most of all, it takes practice. Each chapter in this book provides you with the opportunity to practice a legal skill that you are likely to use again and again after you graduate from law school.

The chapters of this book are organized according to topics that usually are covered in an introductory Property course. In Chapter One, you will reply to a client’s e-mail question concerning who has the superior right to possession of found personal property. Chapter Two requires you to write a letter to an opposing party who claims title to a portion of your client’s land based on adverse possession. In Chapter Three, you must counsel an elderly client who wants to avoid probate by making lifetime gifts. Chapter Four requires you to summarize in writing the legal and practical issues that may arise if your client conveys away a defeasible present interest in real property. You also will prepare the language of a deed that conveys a defeasible present interest. In Chapter Five, you will interview a group of new clients who desire to acquire a commercial investment property as co-owners. Chapter Six involves the negotiation of the terms of a commercial lease. In Chapter Seven, you will craft the major points for a brief in support of claims for fraudulent misrepresentation and failure to disclose latent defects related to your client’s new home. Chapter Eight shows you how to draft various types of deeds. In Chapter Nine, you will draft an easement agreement for a billboard sign. Finally, in Chapter Ten you will negotiate the compensation due to a property owner whose land is being taken for a road improvement project.

Client counseling, legal drafting, negotiation and advocacy are the core skills of the legal profession. Developing Professional Skills: Property provides you with the opportunity to begin to acquire these skills.

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About D.P.S. Property




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Law Faculty Review Copy
Login required Professor's Materials

Sample Materials:
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Sample Chapter 1
Additional Sample Pages
Teacher's Manual Table of Contents
Teacher's Manual Overview of Chapter Topics


DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: WORKPLACE LAW (2017)

Written by: Rachel Arnow-Richman, Nantiya Ruan

Incorporating professional skills and ethics into the traditional workplace law course is a critical but challenging undertaking. This easy-to-use book simplifies the effort, offering eleven discrete exercises designed to help students develop skills in the key areas of drafting, counseling, negotiation and advocacy. Each exercise involves a different substantive area of workplace law, including covenants-not-to compete, wage and hour law, employment discrimination, whistleblower protection and general common law and tort principles. The book is flexible enough to supplement any doctrinal casebook, or can be used to teach a stand-alone skills course.

Students learn tasks such as:
  • Conducting an intake interview with a terminated employee
  • Drafting a discrimination complaint
  • Negotiating the terms of a non-compete agreement
  • Conducting a workplace investigation
  • Revising an employee handbook
  • Advising an employer on a legal compliance issue
  • Writing a demand letter in a collective wage and hour action



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